Spotify study: Music more sexually arousing than touch

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October 30th, 2012

Who would have guessed the most arousing music to play during sex is –

(Fair Warning: Reading any further will cause “Time of my Life” to become stuck your head for the rest of the day.)

That’s right — the soundtrack to the hit ’80s movie “Dirty Dancing.”

And the fact that the 25-year-old soundtrack still gets motors running wasn’t the only surprise finding of a recent study, “Science Behind The Song.”

The study was commissioned by digital music service Spotify to examine the relationship between music, romance and seduction.

“Dirty Dancing” was the top pick for both men and women, although the study’s author, music psychologist Daniel Mullensiefen, also pointed out that men are more willing to adjust their tastes in music in order to ensure “greater success in the bedroom.”

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You’re Spoiling the Kids! When Parents Disagree on Spending

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October 30th, 2012

By Suzanna de Baca
Since I write about the impact finances have on families, I often have friends and colleagues confide about financial issues they face at home. One friend recently shared that he and his wife frequently bicker about spending on their kids. More specifically–her spending. In his opinion, she spoils their two young children, splurging on toys, clothes and birthday gifts for their friends. “She buys them whatever they want,” he explained, “and I don’t think it’s necessary.”

Most arguments about finances have two sides and I suspected this might be the case for my friend. Often, our spending habits (on kids or other things) are a reflection of our values and priorities – which aren’t always perfectly aligned between family members. Arguments about money are a common source of discord among couples in the United States. According to a new survey by the American Institute of CPAs (AICPA), money fights prompt an average of three arguments each month – making it the most volatile topic for spouses.

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Exercise Trumps Brain Games in Keeping Our Minds Intact

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October 24th, 2012

By Alexandra SifferlinOct. 23, 2012

It’s inevitable that as we age, our brains get smaller. Nerves die off, losing their connections, and that leads to a thinned out network feeding our thinking functions. But brain shrinkage isn’t inevitable, according to the latest study of elderly adults.

In recent years, as more research reveals the benefits of staying both physically and mentally active into the golden years, health officials have been urging older people to exercise more and stay mentally engaged by maintaining a rich network of friends and family connections and by learning new skills to keep their brains sharp. Crossword puzzles, learning a new language, playing board games — anything that requires some thought can do the trick.

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Is PMS a Myth?

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October 23rd, 2012

For many women, premenstrual syndrome, or PMS, is a familiar preamble to their monthly cycle. But a new review of the data suggests that mood changes aren’t as closely tied to menses as many have assumed.

A team led by Dr. Sarah Romans of the University of Otago in New Zealand reviewed 47 studies that followed women’s moods across the menstrual cycle. Only 15% of the studies found that women tended to have “classic” PMS: moods that worsened as the menstrual period approached and lifted when menstruation occurred. An additional 38% found PMS that lasted into menstruation or another cycle phase.

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You Annoyed Me at Hello: Why Kids Still Need to Learn Manners

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October 22nd, 2012

It’s fall, which means that the new academic year has started. It also means that my husband, a 37-year-old college professor, has started to shake a fist at his inbox. Why? Because, as surely as leaves fall from trees, my husband’s new crop of undergrads won’t know how to address him. They’ll toggle between no salutation, using his first name only, or greeting him with a cheery: “Hey!”

Sadly, being called “Hey!” by a teen doesn’t inspire my husband’s cheer, nor does it establish the rapport the sender may have wished. Instead, it makes the vexed professor and his wife wonder whether titles are as defunct as an iPhone 4 charger.

Our concerns aren’t just academic. We have a daughter, not yet three, and like many parents, we have grand ambitions for her. One is that we’d like her to be a polite member of society starting, we believe, by addressing adults as Mr., Mrs. and Ms.

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